Dating in the military rules

30-Jun-2015 09:00 by 10 Comments

Dating in the military rules

Fraternization (from Latin frater, brother) is "turning people into brothers"—conducting social relations with people who are actually unrelated and/or of a different class (especially those with whom one works) as though they were siblings, family members, personal friends or lovers.

For example, "fraternization with the enemy" refers to associations with members of enemy groups and suggests a serious conflict of strong, deep, and close romantic interest and attraction, if not the possibility of treason; while "fraternization with civilians" typically suggests transgression of norms forbidding non-civilians and civilians to form close nonprofessional relationships (e.g., romantically), and "fraternization of officers with enlisted personnel" or "seniors with their juniors" (the usual referent of 'fraternization' in a military context) describes associations which are implied to be irregular, unprofessional, improper or imprudent in ways that negatively affect the members and goals of the organization.A vast number of institutions worldwide implement policies forbidding forms of fraternization for many specific reasons.Fraternization may be forbidden to maintain image and morale, to protect and ensure fair and uniform treatment of subordinates, to maintain organizational integrity and the ability to achieve operational goals, and to prevent unauthorized transfers of information.Relations and activities forbidden under these anti-fraternization policies range from romantic and sexual liaisons, through gambling and ongoing business relationships, through insubordination, to excessive familiarity and disrespect of rank.Views on fraternization are mixed and may depend on the relations and classes under discussion.Organizations may relax, change, or reinforce restrictions to reflect changes in the prevailing organizational view or doctrine regarding fraternization.

Within militaries, officers and members of enlisted ranks are typically prohibited from personally associating outside of their professional duties and orders.Excessively familiar relationships between officers of different ranks may also be considered fraternization, especially when between officers in the same chain of command.The reasons for anti-fraternization policies within modern militaries often include the maintenance of discipline and chain of command and the prevention of the spreading of military secrets to enemies, which may amount to treason or sedition under military law.For an example of the former, consider a fighting force in which officers are unwilling to put certain enlisted personnel at risk; if enlisted personnel come to believe that their selection for a perceived suicide mission is not motivated solely by a coldly impartial assessment of military strategy (that is, to sacrifice some units so that the force as a whole will prevail), then they may fail to provide the unhesitating obedience necessary to the realization of that strategy, or even worse, attack their superiors.For an example of the latter, consider a situation in which a senior officer passes secrets to a junior officer, who allows them to be compromised by a romantic interest and consequently to end up in the hands of the enemy. congressmen, this policy was eventually lifted in stages.The Christmas Truce was a notable instance of fraternization in World War I. Over a period of many months this policy was loosened, first by permitting US GIs to talk to German children, then also allowing them to talk to adults in certain circumstances. In June 1945 the prohibition against speaking with German children was made less strict. soldiers and Austrian women were not permitted until January 1946, and with German women until December 1946.